BOOK EXCERPTS


BOOK EXCERPT FROM FUN THROUGH THE SEASONS!




The Star Spangled Flag



How is a flag like Santa Clause?

They both hang out at the pole.
American flags come in all sizes. There are little ones, big ones and humongous ones.
In the summer of 1813, Commander Major George Armistead requested a big flag be made. He wanted a flag so big that “the British would have no difficulty seeing it from a distance.”
In Baltimore they commissioned Mary Young Pickersgill, a “maker of colors,” to sew the huge flag. Mary and her 13 year old daughter, Caroline, used 400 yards of the best quality wool bunting. The stars measured 2 feet from point to point. The red and white stripes measured 2 feet wide each. When they finished the flag of 15 stars and 15 stripes, it measured 30 feet by 42 feet.
Ft. McHenry, which was constructed between 1799 and 1802, was shaped like a five-pointed star! During the Battle of Baltimore in September of 1814, the British bombarded the fort. The huge flag Mary and her daughter made flew proudly, ready to meet the enemy.
Bombshells, weighing as much as 220 lbs., shot through the air. Some exploded in midair! Rockets traced wobbly arcs of red flame across the sky.
Francis Scott Key, a young poet-lawyer witnessed the bombardment while under British guard on an American truce ship.  He and Col. John Skinner had gone to ask for the release of a prisoner. They secured his release but were not allowed to return, having seen the preparations for the enemy’s sea attack.
During the night, by the light of the bombs bursting in the air, they saw the flag flying. Before daylight, there came a sudden silence. Francis Scott Key did not realize it, but the British had ordered a retreat. When day light came, the flag was still there. He was so inspired by the sight of the flag, he began to write on the back of a letter he had in his pocket. He continued to write until he finished the poem that became known as “The Star Spangled Banner.” It became our national anthem in 1931.
Over the years, pieces of the Star Spangled Flag were snipped off by the Armistead family and given away as souvenirs and gifts. The historic flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore, now tattered and torn, is located at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History.

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I HOPE YOU ENJOYED THIS LITTLE EXCERPT FROM THE MONTH OF JULY!

Along with poems, stories, craft and activity ideas, my book is filled with articles and recipes. 
Think your child would like to read more? 
If so, you can go to Amazon or Barnes and Noble and order a copy.

As a little bonus for your child, go to my download page and download a sheet of bookmarks, a coloring page and worksheets your child can print out to go along with his or her book.

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BOOK EXCERPT FROM THE HANDY LITTLE A TO Z BOOK ON WRITING


     This booklet is for the writer, no matter if you are young or old.

If you long to write and need help getting ideas, this booklet is for you.

Each letter of the alphabet will spark your imagination. I will even suggest imaginative ways to publish your writing.

All you have to do is provide your time and your determination. Be persistent and never give up.

Keep this little booklet handy. When you need a little help and encouragement, open it up and find the words that will keep you going.

For each item with an *, check at the end for additional information on that topic.




W



WANTED POSTERS

Just for fun write a wanted poster. Practice your skills of description and details.

WHAT If’s*

WHOPPERS

Write whoppers. The bigger the better.

WOMEN WRITERS

Inspire us and write a book on women writers.

WORDS

Words are magic! Pick the right ones!

WORLD WIDE WEB

There are plenty of places out there on the WWW where you can post or publish your writing.

WRITE

Write, write, write. Don’t talk about writing – write!

WRITING CONFERENCES

Writing conferences are helpful and fun!

*What If's

When writing for children, a good way to come up with an idea is to say, "What if?"

What if the scarecrow didn't scare the birds?

What if the skunk lost its stripe?

What if a long necked giraffe got a sore throat?

What if a mountain could talk?

What if your bad guy had a change of heart - right in the middle of your story?

What if the owl decided to stay up all day and sleep during the night?

What if you found a secret room in your house?

What if you walked through a door in your neighbor's house and it led into a different world?

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   I HOPE YOU ENJOYED THIS LITTLE EXCERPT FROM
THE HANDY LITTLE A to Z BOOK ON WRITING

This PDF is available free on my download page.